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Water Hardness in Oregon Cities

Water hardness is characterized by the concentration of dissolved calcium and magnesium in water. This attribute can vary throughout Oregon, with different regions of the state exhibiting varying levels of water hardness due to differences in geology and water sources.

In Oregon, water hardness levels can range from soft to hard, depending on the specific location within the state. Coastal areas of Oregon often have softer water due to the influence of rainwater and runoff from less mineralized soils. In contrast, areas in eastern Oregon may experience harder water because of the geological formations, such as sedimentary rocks, which can leach higher levels of minerals into the water supply.

Specific water hardness values in Oregon’s cities can provide insight into the local water quality. While these values can change, it’s not uncommon to find that some communities within the state have moderately hard to hard water. The hardness of water in Oregon can affect taste, the efficiency of soaps and detergents, and may have implications for home appliances that use water.

The water hardness levels in the state of Oregon show considerable variation across different cities, with measurements given in parts per million (ppm) and grains per gallon (gpg). Cities such as Keizer, Woodburn, and Newberg have high hardness levels of up to 107 ppm, 6.25 gpg. In contrast, Beaverton and Portland show significantly lower levels as low as 2.3 ppm, 0.12 gpg. Meanwhile, cities like Corvallis and Hillsboro have higher concentrations of hardness at 29.3ppm, 1.69 gpg, and 38.0ppm, 2.22 gpg. However, several cities, including Gresham, Medford, Springfield, and others did not have available data.

CityHardness ppm (mg/L)Hardness gpgInformation SourceNotes
Portland5.50.3LinkUsed the Bull Run number which is listed as the main source. Median of range.
Salem17.01.0Link
Eugene16.00.9LinkFrom Testing Results on this page, not annual CCR
Greshamn/an/aLink
Hillsboro38.02.2LinkUsed In-Town Water System number
Bend21.41.3Link
Beaverton2.30.1LinkUsed the “typical range” listed on report
Medfordn/an/aLink
Springfieldn/an/aLink
Corvallis29.31.7Link
Albanyn/an/aLink
Tigard5.50.3Link
Lake Oswego25.01.5Link
Grants Pass45.42.7Link
Keizer107.06.3Link
Oregon City32.01.9Link
Redmondn/an/aLink
McMinnville26.01.5Link
Tualatin5.50.3LinkBuys from Portland
West Linnn/an/aLink
Wilsonvillen/an/aLink
Forest Groven/an/aLink
Woodburn94.05.5Link
Happy Valleyn/an/aLink
Newberg84.04.9Link
Roseburgn/an/aLink
Klamath Falls86.05.0LinkAverage of 7 listed wells
Ashlandn/an/aLink
Milwaukie80.04.7LinkTook midpoint of listed range
Sherwoodn/an/aLink
Hermistonn/an/aLink
Central Pointn/an/aLinkReceives from Medford
Lebanonn/an/aLink
Canbyn/an/aLink
Dallas30.01.8LinkOnly mention of hardness is that the water is “very soft” with no qualifier, so I took the median of the USGS soft range.
Pendletonn/an/aLink
The Dallesn/an/aLink
Troutdalen/an/aLink
Coos Bayn/an/aLink
St. Helensn/an/aLink
Cornelius38.02.2LinkPurchases from Hillsboro
La Granden/an/aLink
Sandyn/an/aLinkPurchases between 33-50% of water from Portland, sources the rest from a spring and a creek. Does not report hardness number for the latter two.
Gladstonen/an/aLink
Ontarion/an/aLink
Prinevillen/an/aLink
Monmouthn/an/aLink
Fairview90.05.3LinkReport says moderate hardness, doesn’t quantify, so I took median of the USGS defined moderately hard range.
Cottage Grove9.00.5Link
Silvertonn/an/aLink
Newportn/an/aLink
Astorian/an/aLink
North Bendn/an/aLink
Molallan/an/aLink
Independencen/an/aLink
Baker City60.03.5Link
Lincoln Cityn/an/aLink
Sweet Homen/an/aLink
Eagle Pointn/an/aLinkCovered by Medford
Florence191.1Link
Sutherlinn/an/aLink
Hood Rivern/an/aLink
Staytonn/an/aLink
Scappoosen/an/aLink
Madrasn/an/aLink
Umatillan/an/aLink
Seasiden/an/aLinkAlkalinity only
Milton-Freewatern/an/aLink
Junction Cityn/an/aLink
Brookingsn/an/aLink
Warrentonn/an/aLink
Talentn/an/aLinkMost recent report on their website is 2018
Creswelln/an/aLink
Winstonn/an/aLink
Philomathn/an/aLink
Veneta16.00.9LinkSources from Eugene
Tillamook20.01.2Link
King City5.50.3LinkSources from Tigard
Wood Villagen/an/aLink
Estacadan/an/aLink
Sheridann/an/aLink
Lafayetten/an/aLink
Reedsportn/an/aLink
Phoenixn/an/aLinkSources from Medford
Aumsvillen/an/aLink
Coquillen/an/aLink
Boardman90.05.3LinkReport lists water as “moderately hard” but doesn’t specifically quantify. Used median of the USGS defined range for the number.
Harrisburgn/an/aLinkMost recent report was 2016
Toledon/an/aLink
Myrtle Creekn/an/aLink
Hubbardn/an/aLink
North Plains37.82.2Link
Mount Angeln/an/aLink
Bandonn/an/aLink
Jeffersonn/an/aLink
Oakridgen/an/aLink
Dundee22.01.3Link
Nyssan/an/aLink
Millersburgn/an/aLinkShares control of water treatment plant with Albany
Shady Coven/an/aLink
Top 100 Oregon cities by population and their reported water hardness
ppm = Parts Per Million
mg/L = Milligrams Per Liter
gpg = Grains Per Gallon

Hard water can cause issues such as mineral buildup in plumbing and appliances, reduce the efficacy of soaps and detergents, and affect the taste of the water. A tried and true solution is the use of a water softener. A water softener, like the ones from DROP, could be a worthwhile investment.

These devices work by replacing the calcium and magnesium ions that cause hardness with sodium ions, resulting in softer water. With innovative features, easy installation, and efficient operation, DROP smart water softeners provide a solution to hard water issues, extending the lifespan of appliances, improving water taste, enhancing soap effectiveness, reducing scale build-up, and increasing the overall water efficiency in your home.

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