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Water Hardness in Texas Cities

Water hardness, which indicates the concentration of dissolved minerals like calcium and magnesium in water, can vary significantly across the vast state of Texas. Texas, situated in the southern central region of the U.S., exhibits a diverse range of water hardness levels, influenced by its expansive geological diversity.

Within Texas, hardness levels can range from soft in some areas to very hard in others, often reflecting the local geology and the source of water supply. For example, regions such as the Hill Country are known for having very hard water due to the limestone formations that contribute minerals to the water. In contrast, other areas may have comparatively softer water.

This variation in water hardness across Texas affects both the taste of the water and the performance of cleaning agents like soaps and detergents. It can also have implications for the maintenance of water pipes and appliances. Given the state’s size and geological complexity, water hardness levels are not uniform and can change, emphasizing the need for localized water treatment solutions and monitoring.

The data below illustrates a wide spectrum of water hardness measurements across different cities, quantified in Parts Per Million (ppm) and Grains Per Gallon (gpg). Some cities, including San Angelo, Kyle, and Round Rock display significantly high water hardness levels, reaching up to 472 ppm, 27.57 gpg. On the other end of the spectrum, cities like College Station and Bryan boast exceptionally low water hardness figures, downwards of 6.0 ppm, 0.35 gpg. Nonetheless, there is a noticeable absence of water hardness data for several cities, such as San Antonio, Dallas, and Austin, as no current figures are available for these locations.

CityHardness ppm (mg/L)Hardness gpgInformation SourceNotes
Houston136.07.9Link
San Antonion/an/aLink
Dallasn/an/aLink
Austinn/an/aLinkReport mentions they soften the water, but don’t provide a ppm or gpg value
Fort Worth135.57.9Link
El Paso171.410.0LinkFrom the “Chemical Analysis” report at bottom of this page, not the water CCR
Arlington95.15.6Link
Corpus Christi163.09.5Link
Plano142.08.3Link
Lubbock201.011.7Link
Laredon/an/aLink
Irvingn/an/aLink
Garland142.08.3Link
Frisco142.08.3Link
McKinneyn/an/aLink
Amarillon/an/aLink
Grand Prairie170.09.9Link
Brownsville77.34.5Link
Killeenn/an/aLink
Pasadena136.07.9LinkPurchases water from Houston
Dentonn/an/aLinkOnly alkalinity reported, not hardness
Mesquite142.08.3Link
McAllenn/an/aLink
Wacon/an/aLink
Carrolltonn/an/aLink
Midlandn/an/aLink
Pearlandn/an/aLink
Abilene227.013.3Link
Round Rock241.014.1Link
College Station6.00.4Link
Richardson142.08.3Link
League Cityn/an/aLink
Lewisvillen/an/aLink
Beaumontn/an/aLink
Odessan/an/aLink
Sugar Land148.08.6Link
Tyler31.81.9Link
Allen142.08.3Link
Wichita Fallsn/an/aLink
Edinburgn/an/aLink
San Angelo472.027.8LinkTaken from weekly report, was not in CCR. Used the Sept 14 Report
New Braunfelsn/an/aLink
Conroen/an/aLink
Bryan8.50.5Link
Missionn/an/aLink
Temple149.08.7Link
Baytownn/an/aLink
Longview65.13.8Link
Pharrn/an/aLink
Cedar Park175.010.2Link
Flower Moundn/an/aLink
Georgetownn/an/aLink
Missouri Cityn/an/aLink
Mansfield105.06.0Link
Harlingenn/an/aLink
North Richland Hills137.08.0Link
San Marcos283.016.5Link
Leander171.010.0Link
Pflugerville212.412.4Link
Victoria181.010.6Link
Rowlett142.08.3Link
Euless66.93.9LinkTook median of the two sources serving Euless
Wylie142.08.3Link
DeSoton/an/aLink
Port Arthurn/an/aLink
Texas Cityn/an/aLink
Galveston173.010.1Link
Kyle304.016.5Link
Burleson136.07.9Link
Little Elm142.08.3Link
Grapevine121.07.1LinkTook median of two sources serving Grapevine
Rockwall142.08.3Link
Bedford125.07.3Link
Cedar Hilln/an/aLink
Huntsvillen/an/aLink
Haltom City135.57.9Link
Keller135.57.9Link
The Colony11.90.7Link
Sherman95.35.6LinkTook median of the range of the Distribution System sample
Waxahachie94.65.5Link
Schertz100.05.8Link
Coppelln/an/aLink
Weslacon/an/aLink
Friendswood136.07.9LinkPurchases from Houston
Lancastern/an/aLink
Hurst98.05.7Link
Duncanvillen/an/aLink
Rosenberg93.25.4Link
Midlothiann/an/aLink
Copperas Coven/an/aLink
Farmers Branchn/an/aLink
Socorro233.013.6LinkLower Valley Water District Provides their water, and purchases from El Paso, took average of two Lower Valley listings on the El Paso CCR
Texarkanan/an/aLink
La Porten/an/aLink
San Juann/an/aLink
Del Rion/an/aLink
Prosper142.08.3Link
Lufkinn/an/aLink
Weatherford151.08.8Link
Deer Parkn/an/aLink
Top 100 Texas cities by population and their reported water hardness
ppm = Parts Per Million
mg/L = Milligrams Per Liter
gpg = Grains Per Gallon

Hard water can cause issues such as mineral buildup in plumbing and appliances, reduce the efficacy of soaps and detergents, and affect the taste of the water. A tried and true solution is the use of a water softener. A water softener, like the ones from DROP, could be a worthwhile investment.

These devices work by replacing the calcium and magnesium ions that cause hardness with sodium ions, resulting in softer water. With innovative features, easy installation, and efficient operation, DROP smart water softeners provide a solution to hard water issues, extending the lifespan of appliances, improving water taste, enhancing soap effectiveness, reducing scale build-up, and increasing the overall water efficiency in your home.

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